Classic Cinnamon Rolls

Classic Cinnamon Rolls

The stickier, the better with this timeless treat. One of our favorite comfort foods, the recipe originated in Sweden, where they actually observe a Cinnamon Roll Day (Kanelbullens dag) on October 4, but we recommend celebrating these rolls every chance you get. Find more delicious yeasted bread recipes in our Bread 2020 special issue!

5.0 from 2 reviews
Classic Cinnamon Rolls
 
Makes 10 to 12
Ingredients
  • Rolls:
  • Cinnamon Roll Dough (recipe follows)
  • ¾ cup (165 grams) firmly packed light brown sugar
  • 1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon (8 grams) ground cinnamon
  • ½ cup plus 2 tablespoons (141 grams) unsalted butter, softened
  • 1 large egg, lightly beaten
  • Frosting:
  • ½ cup cream cheese, softened
  • 1½ tablespoons (21 grams) unsalted butter, softened
  • 1½ cups (180 grams) confectioners’ sugar
  • 1 tablespoon whole milk
Instructions
  1. Spray a 10-inch round cake pan or a 13x9-inch sheet pan with cooking spray.
  2. For rolls: Lightly punch down Cinnamon Roll Dough. Cover and let stand for 5 minutes. Turn out dough onto a lightly floured surface, and roll into an 18x12-inch rectangle.
  3. In a small bowl, combine brown sugar and cinnamon. Spread butter onto dough, and sprinkle with sugar mixture, leaving a ½-inch border on one long side. Brush egg over side of dough without filling.
  4. Starting with one long side, roll dough into a log, pinching seam to seal. Trim ends. For round cake pan, slice into 10 rolls; for sheet pan, slice into 12 rolls. Place in prepared pan. Let rise in a warm, draft-free place (75°) until puffed and rolls are touching, about 30 minutes.
  5. Preheat oven to 350°F. (We recommend placing a sheet of aluminum foil on top of bottom rack.)
  6. Bake until a wooden pick inserted in center comes out clean, about 25 minutes. Let cool in pan for 10 minutes. Remove from pan.
  7. For frosting: In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, beat cream cheese and butter at medium speed until creamy, 4 to 5 minutes. With stand mixer at low speed, gradually add confectioners’ sugar, beating until fluffy. Stir in milk until combined. Spread onto warm rolls.

 

 

5.0 from 2 reviews
Cinnamon Roll Dough
 
Makes dough for 10 to 12 rolls
Ingredients
  • 1 cup (240 grams) warm whole milk (105°F/40°C to 110°F /43°C), divided
  • 1 (0.25-ounce) package active dry yeast
  • ⅓ cup (76 grams) unsalted butter, melted
  • ⅓ cup (67 grams) granulated sugar
  • ¼ cup (60 grams) sour cream
  • 1 large egg (50 grams)
  • 4 cups (500 grams) all-purpose flour, divided
  • 1 teaspoon (3 grams) kosher salt
Instructions
  1. In a medium bowl, combine ¾ cup (180 grams) warm milk and yeast. Let stand until mixture is foamy, about 10 minutes.
  2. In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, stir together melted butter, sugar, sour cream, egg, and remaining ¼ cup (60 grams) milk.
  3. In a large bowl, whisk together 3⅔ cups (459 grams) flour and salt. Stir half of flour mixture into butter mixture. With mixer on low speed, add yeast mixture, beating just until combined. Beat in remaining flour mixture. Switch to the dough hook attachment. Beat at medium speed until smooth and elastic, about 4 minutes. Add remaining ⅓ cup (42 grams) flour, if needed (dough should not be sticky).
  4. Spray a large bowl with cooking spray. Place dough in bowl, turning to grease top. Loosely cover and let rise in a warm, draft-free place (75°F/24°C) until doubled in size, about 1 hour.

19 COMMENTS

    • Hey Caroline,

      Thanks for reaching out! If you look at the ingredients, you will see that the Cinnamon Roll Dough is in a different color, meaning that it is linked to that recipe on another page. If you click on the colored words, you’ll be able to access the Cinnamon Roll Dough and then proceed with the recipe. We hope this has been helpful and that you will be able to make this recipe soon!

    • Hi Julie! You can freeze these rolls after they are baked and iced, but only once they have completely cooled. Leave them in the pan they baked in and wrap it tightly in plastic wrap and foil. To thaw, leave them still wrapped in the refrigerator until they thaw out. We hope this helps!

    • Hi Kelsey,

      Thanks for reaching out! Yes, you can assemble the rolls, place into pan, and then place them directly into the fridge (covered). Next-day proofing times may vary, as it could take 30 to 45 minutes at room temp after a sitting in the fridge, or slightly longer. The one caveat is that the rolls tend to bake up inconsistently when made this way. We’ve seen sunken centers and raised edges. That being said, we prefer to punch down the dough after the first rise, cover, and refrigerate overnight. The next day while the oven preheats, you can roll out the cold dough, assemble the rolls, and let proof. This will yield the best results!

    • Hi Jenny!

      Thanks for reaching out! Yes, you can assemble the rolls, place into pan, and then place them directly into the fridge (covered). Next-day proofing times may vary, as it could take 30 to 45 minutes at room temp after a sitting in the fridge, or slightly longer. The one caveat is that the rolls tend to bake up inconsistently when made this way. We’ve seen sunken centers and raised edges. That being said, we prefer to punch down the dough after the first rise, cover, and refrigerate overnight. The next day while the oven preheats, you can roll out the cold dough, assemble the rolls, and let proof. This will yield the best results!

    • Hi Nancy!

      Thanks for reaching out! Yes, you can assemble the rolls, place into pan, and then place them directly into the fridge (covered). Next-day proofing times may vary, as it could take 30 to 45 minutes at room temp after a sitting in the fridge, or slightly longer. The one caveat is that the rolls tend to bake up inconsistently when made this way. We’ve seen sunken centers and raised edges. That being said, we prefer to punch down the dough after the first rise, cover, and refrigerate overnight. The next day while the oven preheats, you can roll out the cold dough, assemble the rolls, and let proof. This will yield the best results!

  1. Hi,
    I am aiming to have these early in the AM for Christmas, and was wondering if they could be partially premade before baking? For example, make the dough the night before and store in the fridge? Or assemble the rolls the night before, store in fridge, and bake in the morning? Would really appreciate it!

    • Hi Grace!

      Our apologies for the late response. We hope that you gave it a try and can let our readers know how they turned out! For future reference, you can assemble the rolls, place into pan, and then place them directly into the fridge (covered). Next-day proofing times may vary, as it could take 30 to 45 minutes at room temp after a sitting in the fridge, or slightly longer. The one caveat is that the rolls tend to bake up inconsistently when made this way. We’ve seen sunken centers and raised edges. That being said, we prefer to punch down the dough after the first rise, cover, and refrigerate overnight. The next day while the oven preheats, you can roll out the cold dough, assemble the rolls, and let proof. This will yield the best results!

    • Hi Lisa,

      Thanks for reaching out! Yes, you can assemble the rolls, place into pan, and then place them directly into the fridge (covered). Next-day proofing times may vary, as it could take 30 to 45 minutes at room temp after a sitting in the fridge, or slightly longer. The one caveat is that the rolls tend to bake up inconsistently when made this way. We’ve seen sunken centers and raised edges. That being said, we prefer to punch down the dough after the first rise, cover, and refrigerate overnight. The next day while the oven preheats, you can roll out the cold dough, assemble the rolls, and let proof. This will yield the best results!

    • Hi Kelli!

      Thanks for reaching out! Yes, you can assemble the rolls, place into pan, and then place them directly into the fridge (covered). Next-day proofing times may vary, as it could take 30 to 45 minutes at room temp after a sitting in the fridge, or slightly longer. The one caveat is that the rolls tend to bake up inconsistently when made this way. We’ve seen sunken centers and raised edges. That being said, we prefer to punch down the dough after the first rise, cover, and refrigerate overnight. The next day while the oven preheats, you can roll out the cold dough, assemble the rolls, and let proof. This will yield the best results!

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