Classic Olive Oil Cake

A staple in most Mediterranean kitchens, this light and barely sweet cake is perfect for an afternoon snack or late morning tea. A final brush of olive oil just before serving brings the fruity flavor to the front of your palate as soon as you take a bite.

5.0 from 15 reviews
Classic Olive Oil Cake
Serves: 1 (8-inch) cake
 
Ingredients
  • 3 large eggs (150 grams)
  • ¾ cup (150 grams) granulated sugar
  • ½ cup (112 grams) extra-virgin olive oil
  • ½ cup (120 grams) whole milk
  • ½ teaspoon (2 grams) vanilla extract
  • ¼ teaspoon (1 gram) almond extract
  • 1½ cups (188 grams) all-purpose flour
  • 1½ teaspoons (7.5 grams) baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon (1.5 grams) kosher salt
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 350°F (180°C). Spray an 8-inch round cake pan with baking spray with flour; line bottom of pan with parchment paper.
  2. In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment, beat eggs and sugar at high speed for 30 seconds. Add oil in a slow, steady stream, beating until combined. Add milk, beating until combined. Reduce mixer speed to low. Beat in extracts.
  3. In a medium bowl, whisk together flour, baking powder, and salt. Gradually add flour mixture to egg mixture, beating until combined, stopping to scrape sides of bowl. Pour batter into prepared pan.
  4. Bake until a wooden pick inserted in center comes out clean, 30 to 33 minutes. Let cool in pan for 5 minutes. Remove from pan, and let cool completely on a wire rack. Brush with fresh olive oil just before serving. Store at room temperature wrapped loosely in foil or plastic wrap.

 

45 COMMENTS

  1. This has been the basis for my poppyseed lemon cake for years
    2 tsp lemon zest 2 Tbl lemon or lime juice 5 tbl poppyseeds
    while cake is baking squeeze the juice from 3 lemons strain place into sm saucepan
    add 1 cup powdered sugar DO NOT STIR,
    bring to a boil until mixture raises to top remove from heat.
    10 min after cake comes out place on plate prick and slowly pour over warm cake
    let cool then refrigerate covered for 6 hours. serve with lemon hello sherbet or vanilla ice-cream

  2. I have made this cake twice, both times it came out delicious. This is the kind of cake you can eat any time and it stays moist for a good period of time.

  3. Oh, my! Delicious! I won’t admit how much I ate last night, but I don’t have to worry about it staying fresh too long. It’s sweetness reminded me of perfect corn bread.

  4. Do you use a shallow or deep cake pan ? I am making this for a dinner party Saturday plud fresh raspberries with raspberry coulis and whipped cream with toasted sliced almonds. I can’t wait to try this.

  5. When you say line the pan with parchment paper does that go on the inside of the pan and on top of the oil spray and light flour?

    • Hi there! Adding lemon or orange zest to the batter should not affect the outcome of this recipe, however please note that we have not tested this recipe with either so we cannot speak to the outcome.

    • Hey Hasha,

      You could use water if you’re in a pinch, just know that the cake will not be as tender, as the fat in the dairy helps tenderize the crumb. Overall, it will still work though!

  6. Never heard about olive oil cake before. I’m going to try it with my family tonight. I’ll let you know the outcome

  7. Is it best to use an 8” or 9” round cake pan? Recipe says 8” but Kyle Grace Mills says 9” and “we recommend” not to use a smaller diameter.

    Someone, please clarify. I need to get baking on it in the morning.

    Thank you so much.

    • Hey Thelma Louise,

      I apologize for the confusion! I was responding to a query about another layered cake on a different page and for some strange reason, it showed up here. Please use an 8-inch cake pan. Although you could use a nine inch cake pan, just know it’ll bake faster and not be as tall.

      • Thanks for the speedy reply! I made it this morning. Smelled so good and, oh my stars, was such a delicious treat after lunch!

  8. I am a huge fan of almond olive oil cakes, and liked that this was an 8″ one. It turned out great and I was happy to find one that did not contain orange or lemon in the actual cake! It is moist and appropriate as either a snack cake, or a breakfast or dessert cake, especially if served with fruit (and maybe yogurt or whipped cream) on the side.

    The only very very minor changes I made is switching the amounts of the extracts (I like more almond flavor, but still kept some vanilla extract) and decorating the top with sliced almonds before putting it in the oven. It came out lovely with the almond slices on top!

    To the person who asked about the pan depth, I would recommend using a slightly deeper 8″ round cake pan, like I did. Even with the deeper pan, the cake rose a bit above the pan’s sides.

  9. Thank you for the recipe, the cake came out delicious! I didn’t have almond extract so I doubled the amount of vanilla. I made this for my daughter‘s birthday thanks again.

  10. Kyle Grace: This is the best recipe! Have been looking for this since our favorite Italian restaurant closed several years ago – their cake was to die for; this is even better. TY.

  11. This is the most amazing cake. Thanks for sharing as I didn’t have this recipe in my hard copy magazines.

  12. Perfect for Sunday afternoon tea! No fuss and over-the-top preparations, just simple, classic Olive Oil Cake that’s perfect for any tea! 🙂 Thanks for sharing this recipe.

  13. This is a fabulous recipe and so easy to bake. I’ve made it twice and a hit both times. It’s perfect for summer. I lessened the sugar to 1/2 c and it was sweet enough. Note that if you have a choice between 8” or 9” pan, I’d go with the 8” as this cake does not rise a whole lot. I only had a 9” so it was flatter but I added a dollop of plain unsweetened yogurt and blueberries on top. It was scrumptious presented well..

Leave a Reply to Jane Lee Cancel reply

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Rate this recipe:  

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.