Ginger Pear Skillet Cake

Packed with crystallized ginger and diced pears, this rich, buttery skillet cake is sure to impress any weeknight guest. A final sprinkle of sugar adds a little crunch that contrasts the dense, moist texture of the cake. Find more cozy skillet recipes in our Fall Baking 2019 special issue!

5.0 from 1 reviews
Ginger Pear Skillet Cake
 
Makes 1 (10-inch) cake
Ingredients
  • ¾ cup (170 grams) unsalted butter, softened
  • 1½ cups (300 grams) plus 3 tablespoons (36 grams) granulated sugar, divided
  • 3 large eggs (150 grams)
  • ¾ teaspoon (3 grams) almond extract
  • 2 cups (250 grams) all-purpose flour
  • 1¾ teaspoons (8.75 grams) baking powder
  • ¾ teaspoon (2.25 grams) kosher salt
  • ¾ cup (180 grams) crème fraîche
  • 1 pound (455 grams) pears, peeled and diced
  • 3 tablespoons (69 grams) chopped crystallized ginger, divided
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 350°F (180°C) . Butter and flour a 10-inch enamel-coated cast-iron skillet.
  2. In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, beat butter and 1½ cups (300 grams) sugar at medium speed until fluffy, 3 to 4 minutes, stopping to scrape sides of bowl. Add eggs, one at a time, beating well after each addition. Beat in almond extract.
  3. In a medium bowl, whisk together flour, baking powder, and salt. With mixer on low speed, gradually add flour mixture to butter mixture alternately with crème fraîche, beginning and ending with flour mixture, beating just until combined after each addition. Fold in half of pears and 1½ tablespoons (34.5 grams) ginger.
  4. Spoon batter into prepared pan, spreading to edges. Arrange remaining pears and remaining ½ tablespoons (34.5 grams) ginger on top, slightly pressing into batter. Sprinkle with tablespoons (24 grams) sugar.
  5. Bake until a wooden pick inserted in center comes out clean, about 50 minutes, covering with foil to prevent excess browning, if necessary. Remove from oven; sprinkle with remaining tablespoon (12 grams) sugar. Let cool completely.
Notes
Pro Tip: If you don’t have a 10-inch cast-iron or ovenproof skillet, a 10-inch round cake pan will work, too.

 

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