Brian Hart Hoffman’s Buttermilk Biscuits with White Lily Flour

Sponsored Content

Though he was born and raised in Birmingham, Alabama, Brian is a citizen of the world whose background as a flight attendant and career in publishing have allowed him to travel the globe in search of the best baked goods. He’s fallen in love with specialties from France, Portugal, England, and even Japan, but his Southern roots have given him a soft spot for good, old-fashioned Southern biscuits. Rich, buttery, and flaky, Brian’s go-to Buttermilk Biscuits are an ode to the perfect Southern biscuit. White Lily flour is the not-so-secret ingredient, giving them a soft, pillowy crumb that’ll keep you coming back for more.

Don’t miss out on our National Biscuit Month giveaway, hosted by White Lily! Win a trip for two to Charleston, South Carolina, by baking these biscuits and uploading a photo of them on Instagram! Follow @thebakefeed and @whitelilybaking, and use @whitelilybaking#thebakefeed, #whitelilyflour, and #contest in your caption to be entered to win! Visit our Instagram post for more details.
Editor-in-Chief Brian Hart Hoffman

Get to know Brian

Brian is the editor-in-chief of Bake from Scratch magazine, and also serves as president and chief creative officer of our publishing company, Hoffman Media. Brian first fell in love with baking as a child, learning to bake at his mother’s side, and has been an avid home baker ever since. He founded Bake from Scratch in 2015 to celebrate all things baking, as well as the talented bakers, pastry chefs, and bloggers who make the world of baking such an inspiring and diverse community. 

Brian is also the author of The Coupewhich celebrates craft cocktails and vintage collections. Prior to joining the company in 2007, Brian worked in the airline industry, which allowed him to live in six cities throughout the United States and visit all 50 states. His career as a flight attendant instilled a deep love of traveling in him, which he brings to our magazine through recipes and stories inspired by baking culture around the world.

Brian Hart Hoffman's Buttermilk Biscuits with White Lily Flour
 
Makes 12 biscuits
Ingredients
  • 3½ cups (438 grams) White Lily All-Purpose Flour
  • 2 tablespoons (24 grams) granulated sugar
  • 1 tablespoon (9 grams) kosher salt
  • 1 tablespoon (15 grams) baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon (2.5 grams) baking soda
  • 1¼ cups (284 grams) cold unsalted butter, cubed
  • 1 cup (240 grams) whole buttermilk, chilled
  • 1 large egg (50 grams), lightly beaten
  • Flaked sea salt, for sprinkling
  • Softened butter and honey, to serve
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 425°F (220°C). Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
  2. In a large bowl, whisk together flour, sugar, kosher salt, baking powder, and baking soda. Using a pastry blender, cut in cold butter until mixture is crumbly. Stir in cold buttermilk until a shaggy dough forms.
  3. Turn out dough onto a lightly floured surface. Pat dough into a rectangle, and cut into fourths. Stack each fourth on top of each other, and pat down into a rectangle again. Repeat procedure 3 more times. Pat or roll dough to 1-inch thickness. Using a 2½-inch round cutter dipped in flour, cut dough without twisting cutter, rerolling scraps as necessary. Place biscuits 2 inches apart on prepared pan. Freeze until cold, about 10 minutes. Brush with egg wash, and sprinkle with sea salt.
  4. Bake until golden brown, about 15 minutes. Serve warm with softened butter and honey.

National Biscuit Month Newsletter Signup

Sign up below to receive updates from White Lily Flour, Callie’s Biscuits, and Bake from Scratch Magazine. 

*Signing up does not increase your chances of winning the Charleston Giveaway.

2 COMMENTS

    • Hey Liz,

      When in doubt, a cup of whole milk with 1 tablespoon vinegar or lemon juice added in will work! The important thing is to get that acidic tang, and both lemon juice and vinegar will give it to you in a pinch. Happy baking!

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Rate this recipe:  

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.